He who has been forgiven must open himself to forgive

Category: news
Published: Tuesday, 19 September 2017
Written by Super User

During the Sunday Angelus, before 30,000 people, Pope Francis reflected on forgiveness, the theme of the Gospel of the day.

He said that even when it is difficult to forgive, it's helpful to remember the parable and words of the owner who forgave every debt of his ruthless servant.

POPE FRANCIS
"Should not you also have pity on your servant, just as I have had pity on you? Whoever has experienced the joy, peace and inner freedom that comes from being forgiven, can open himself to the possibility of forgiving others."

Pope Francis recalled that the mercy of God has no limits and that a small sign of repentance is enough for God to forgive us.

(Source: Rome Reports)

Not praying for world leaders is a sin

Category: news
Published: Tuesday, 19 September 2017
Written by Super User

Today Pope Francis addressed both leaders and non-leaders. He spoke about the importance of being aware that each person is subordinate to someone more powerful. He said that Christians must pray for their leaders, even if they don't agree with them.

POPE FRANCIS
“I ask you this favor: every one of you take five minutes, no more. If you are a leader, ask yourself: ‘Do I pray to the One who gave me power through the people?’ If you are not a leader, ‘Do I pray for my leaders? 1:00 FLASH 1:11 And if you find in your examination of conscience before Confession that you have not prayed for your leaders, bring it to Confession. Because not to pray for leaders is a sin.”

Pope Francis called each person to engage in intercessory prayer for all kings and leaders. He said it is through prayers that the world will regain a calm and peaceful way of life.

EXCERPTS OF POPE'S HOMILY IN ENGLISH
“This man felt the need to pray because he was aware that he did not have everything under his control. He knew that above him was another who was really in charge. The centurion had soldiers as subordinates but he was also aware of being a subordinate. This awareness led him to pray.

If leaders do not pray, they close themselves off in a self-referential circle or in that of their party, a circle from which they cannot escape. It is important to be aware that we are all subordinate to someone more powerful. And those who are more powerful than political leaders, he suggested, are both the people who gave those leaders their power, “and God from whom their power comes through the people. Political leaders pray when they are aware of being a subordinate.

We need to accompany them with our prayer, he said. Christians must pray for their leaders, even if they do “bad things”. In this case, the Pope continued, they need prayer even more: Pray, and do penance for leaders. Intercessory prayer is such a wonderful thing, as Paul says. It is to be done for all kings, for all persons in positions of power. Why? ‘So that we can live a calm and peaceful life.’ When a leader is free and can govern in peace, the whole population benefits.

I ask you this favor: every one of you take five minutes, no more. If you are a leader, ask yourself: ‘Do I pray to the One who gave me power through the people?’ If you are not a leader, ‘Do I pray for my leaders? Yes, for this one and that one, yes, because I like them; but for that one, no.’ They need it so much more for this reason! ‘Do I pray for all leaders?’ And if you find in your examination of conscience before Confession that you have not prayed for your leaders, bring it to Confession. Because not to pray for leaders is a sin.”

Source:Rome Reports

SYNOD QUESTIONNAIRE

Category: news
Published: Wednesday, 12 July 2017
Written by Super User

Questionnaire in preparation for the 15th ordinary general assembly of the synod of bishops on the youth under the theme, ‘young people, the faith and vocational discernment’

Read more: SYNOD QUESTIONNAIRE

Pope Decentralizes

Category: news
Published: Tuesday, 12 September 2017
Written by Super User

Pope Francis Decentralizes most Authority for Liturgical Translations to Local Bishops

Pope Francis has decentralized authority over how the texts used in the Catholic Church's liturgies are translated from Latin into local languages, moving most responsibility for the matter from the Vatican to national bishops' conferences.

In a motuproprio issued Sept. 9, the pontiff says he is making a change to the church's Code of Canon Law so that the Second Vatican Council's call to make the liturgy more understandable to people is "more clearly reaffirmed and put into practice."

The motuproprio, given the title Magnum Principium, modifies two clauses of Canon 838. The rewritten clauses say simply that the Vatican is to "recognize" adaptations of Latin liturgical texts approved by national bishops' conferences.

A comparison of the Italian text of the prior and new versions of the canon makes the change clear. Where the Italian says the Vatican was tasked before with "authorizing" all liturgical translations, it is now asked simply to "review" translations made by the bishops' conferences.

That review will partly come through a process of confirming that the translations appropriately reflect the intent of the original Latin, known as a confirmatio.
The Vatican's Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments said in a note accompanying the release of the motuproprio that the confirmatio process "leaves responsibility for the translation, presumed to be faithful, to the pastoral and doctrinal munus of the bishops' conference."

The congregation adds that the confirmatio "presupposes a positive evaluation of the faithfulness and congruence of the produced texts with respect to the Latin text."
The process of crafting translations of Latin texts into local languages has been one of the most controversial and acrimonious in the Catholic Church since the end of the Council, held from 1962-65.

National Catholic Reporter (NCR) || By Joshua J. McElwee || 09 September 2017



World Day

Category: news
Published: Wednesday, 13 September 2017
Written by Super User

Joint Message  of Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew on the World Day of prayer for creation

The story of creation presents us with a panoramic view of the world. Scripture reveals that, “in the beginning”, God intended humanity to cooperate in the preservation and protection of the natural environment. At first, as we read in Genesis, “no plant of the field was yet in the earth and no herb of the field had yet sprung up – for the Lord God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was no one to till the ground” (2:5). The earth was entrusted to us as a sublime gift and legacy, for which all of us share responsibility until, “in the end”, all things in heaven and on earth will be restored in Christ (cf. Eph 1:10). Our human dignity and welfare are deeply connected to our care for the whole of creation.


However, “in the meantime”, the history of the world presents a very different context. It reveals a morally decaying scenario where our attitude and behaviour towards creation obscures our calling as God’s co-operators. Our propensity to interrupt the world’s delicate and balanced ecosystems, our insatiable desire to manipulate and control the planet’s limited resources, and our greed for limitless profit in markets – all these have alienated us from the original purpose of creation. We no longer respect nature as a shared gift; instead, we regard it as aprivate possession. We no longer associate with nature in order to sustain it; instead, we lord over it to support our own constructs.


The consequences of this alternative worldview are tragic and lasting. The human environment and the natural environment are deteriorating together, and this deterioration of the planet weighs upon the most vulnerable of its people. The impact of climate change affects, first and foremost, those who live in poverty in every corner of the globe. Our obligation to use the earth’s goods responsibly implies the recognition of and respect for all people and all living creatures. The urgent call and challenge to care for creation are an invitation for all of humanity to work towards sustainable and integral development.

Therefore, united by the same concern for God’s creation and acknowledging the earth as a shared good, we fervently invite all people of goodwill to dedicate a time of prayer for the environment on 1 September. On this occasion, we wish to offer thanks to the loving Creator for the noble gift of creation and to pledge commitment to its care and preservation for the sake of future generations. After all, we know that we labour in vain if the Lord is not by our side (cf. Ps 126-127), if prayer is not at the centre of our reflection and celebration. Indeed, an objective of our prayer is to change the way we perceive the world in order to change the way we relate to the world. The goal of our promise is to be courageous in embracing greater simplicity and solidarity in our lives.

We urgently appeal to those in positions of social and economic, as well as political and cultural, responsibility to hear the cry of the earth and to attend to the needs of the marginalized, but above all to respond to the plea of millions and support the consensus of the world for the healing of our wounded creation.

We are convinced that there can be no sincere and enduring resolution to the challenge of the ecological crisis and climate change unless the response is concerted and collective, unless the responsibility is shared and accountable, unless we give priority to solidarity and service.

From the Vatican and from the Phanar, 1 September 2017
Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew

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